Accessibility articles

Accessibility Matters: Meet Our New Book, “Inclusive Design Patterns” (Pre-Release)


  

Accessibility has always been a slightly unsettling realm for web developers. Surrounded with myths, misunderstandings and contradicting best practices, it used to be a domain for a small group of experts who would “add” accessibility on top of the finished product.

Pre-release: Inclusive Design Patterns written by Heydon Pickering

Today we’re privileged to announce our brand new book on inclusive design patterns, written by Heydon Pickering, with dozens of practical examples of accessible interface components and inclusive design workflow, applicable to your work right away. With this book, you’ll know exactly how to keep interfaces accessible from the very start, and how to design and build inclusive websites without hassle and unnecessary code.

The post Accessibility Matters: Meet Our New Book, “Inclusive Design Patterns” (Pre-Release) appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Designing A Dementia-Friendly Website


  

Some well-established web design basics: minimize the number of choices that someone has to make; create self-explanatory navigation tools; help people get to what they’re looking for as quickly as possible. Sounds simple enough? Now consider this…

Designing A Dementia-Friendly Website

An ever growing number of web users around the world are living with dementia. They have very varied levels of computer literacy and may be experiencing some of the following issues: memory loss, confusion, issues with vision and perception, difficulties sequencing and processing information, reduced problem-solving abilities, or problems with language.

The post Designing A Dementia-Friendly Website appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Making Accessibility Simpler, With Ally.js


  

I’ve been a web developer for 15 years, but I’d never looked into accessibility. I didn’t know enough people with (serious) disabilities to properly understand the need for accessible applications and no customer has ever required me to know what ARIA is. But I got involved with accessibility anyway – and that’s the story I’d like to share with you today.

Making Accessibility Simpler

At the Fronteers Conference in October 2014 I saw Heydon Pickering give a talk called “Getting nowhere with CSS best practices”. Among other things, he made a case for using WAI-ARIA attributes like aria-disabled="true" instead of classes like .is-disabled to express application state. It struck me then and there that I was missing out on a few well-prepared standards, simply because ARIA belongs to that accessibility space that I had no idea of.

The post Making Accessibility Simpler, With Ally.js appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Making Accessibility Simpler, With Ally.js


  

I’ve been a web developer for 15 years, but I’d never looked into accessibility. I didn’t know enough people with (serious) disabilities to properly understand the need for accessible applications and no customer has ever required me to know what ARIA is. But I got involved with accessibility anyway – and that’s the story I’d like to share with you today.

Making Accessibility Simpler

At the Fronteers Conference in October 2014 I saw Heydon Pickering give a talk called “Getting nowhere with CSS best practices”. Among other things, he made a case for using WAI-ARIA attributes like aria-disabled="true" instead of classes like .is-disabled to express application state. It struck me then and there that I was missing out on a few well-prepared standards, simply because ARIA belongs to that accessibility space that I had no idea of.

The post Making Accessibility Simpler, With Ally.js appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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