Animation articles

Prototype And Code: Creating A Custom Pull-To-Refresh Gesture Animation




 


 

Pull-to-refresh is one of the most popular gestures in mobile applications right now. It’s easy to use, natural and so intuitive that it is hard to imagine refreshing a page without it. In 2010, Loren Brichter created Tweetie, one of numerous Twitter applications. Diving into the pool of similar applications, you won’t see much difference among them; but Loren’s Tweetie stood out then.

Prototype And Code: Creating A Custom Pull-To-Refresh Gesture Animation

It was one simple animation that changed the game — pull-to-refresh, an absolute innovation for the time. No wonder Twitter didn’t hesitate to buy Tweetie and hire Loren Brichter. Wise choice! As time went on, more and more developers integrated this gesture into their applications, and finally, Apple itself brought pull-to-refresh to its system application Mail, to the joy of people who value usability.

The post Prototype And Code: Creating A Custom Pull-To-Refresh Gesture Animation appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

How Functional Animation Helps Improve User Experience




 


 

Since humans are visually driven creatures, the impact of imagery only increases with the help of animation. Our eyes innately pay attention to moving objects, and animation is like eye candy — catchy and bright elements that call attention to and help differentiate an app from its competitors.

How Functional Animation Helps Improve User Experience

As of late, more and more designers are incorporating animation as a functional element that enhances the user experience. Animation is no longer just for delight; it is one of the most important tools for successful interaction.

The post How Functional Animation Helps Improve User Experience appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

GPU Animation: Doing It Right




 


 

Most people now know that modern web browsers use the GPU to render parts of web pages, especially ones with animation. For example, a CSS animation using the transform property looks much smoother than one using the left and top properties. But if you ask, “How do I get smooth animation from the GPU?” in most cases, you’ll hear something like, “Use transform: translateZ(0) or will-change: transform.”

Two layers, a browser layer and a GPU layer that create the animation

These properties have become something like how we used zoom: 1 for Internet Explorer 6 (if you catch my drift) in terms of preparing animation for the GPU — or compositing, as browser vendors like to call it. But sometimes animation that is nice and smooth in a simple demo runs very slowly on a real website, introduces visual artifacts or even crashes the browser. Why does this happen? How do we fix it? Let’s try to understand.

The post GPU Animation: Doing It Right appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Upgrading CSS Animation With Motion Curves




 


 

There is UI animation, and then there is good UI animation. Good animation makes you go “Wow!” — it’s smooth, beautiful and, most of all, natural, not blocky, rigid or robotic. If you frequent Dribbble or UpLabs, you’ll know what I am talking about.

Alt-Text

With so many amazing designers creating such beautiful animations, any developer would naturally want to recreate them in their own projects. Now, CSS does provide some presets for transition-timing-function, such as ease-in, ease-out and ease-in-out, which add some level of smoothness and realism, but they are very generic, aren’t they? How boring would it be if every animation on the web followed the same three timing functions?

The post Upgrading CSS Animation With Motion Curves appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Experience Design Essentials: Animated Microinteractions In Mobile Apps




 


 

Dariel Fitzkee, the famous magician, once said, “Magic is both in the details and in the performance.” Interaction design is just like that. Designers love to get the big picture right, but if the details aren’t handled properly, the solution will fail. The magic is all in the details. That’s why well-designed microinteractions make experiences feel crafted.

Experience Design Essentials: Animated Microinteractions In Mobile Apps

To get a better understanding of how your design benefits from microinteractions, it will help to sketch out your app ideas. Adobe introduced a new design and wireframing app called Experience Design (or Adobe XD) which lets you design wireframes and make them interactive. You can download and test Adobe XD for free.

The post Experience Design Essentials: Animated Microinteractions In Mobile Apps appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

How To Integrate Motion Design In The UX Workflow


  

As UX professionals, we play a key role in raising the bar for customer experiences. A simple attention to detail is often what signals to the customer that we’re thinking about them. In the digital space, we focus on user interactions within applications devices and processes.

Motion Design In The UX Workflow

With the ever-increasing computing power of desktops, browser sophistication and use of native apps, every day we learn of new ways to push the limits of what defines a well-crafted UI. When used correctly, motion can be a key utility in helping your users achieve their goals.

The post How To Integrate Motion Design In The UX Workflow appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Animating Clipped Elements In SVG


  

Scalable Vector Graphics (or SVG) lend developers an incredible ability to display crisp, beautiful graphics at any size or resolution. SVG can also be animated using various techniques. In combination with clipping paths, interesting effects can be achieved.

Animating Clipped Elements In SVG

This article explains the difference between an SVG clipPath and a CSS clip-path, including examples to guide and inform you through this journey. Finally, I’ll share a few demos both personal and in the wild to help you better understand clipPath animation and inspire your visions.

The post Animating Clipped Elements In SVG appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Animating Clipped Elements In SVG


  

Scalable Vector Graphics (or SVG) lend developers an incredible ability to display crisp, beautiful graphics at any size or resolution. SVG can also be animated using various techniques. In combination with clipping paths, interesting effects can be achieved.

Animating Clipped Elements In SVG

This article explains the difference between an SVG clipPath and a CSS clip-path, including examples to guide and inform you through this journey. Finally, I’ll share a few demos both personal and in the wild to help you better understand clipPath animation and inspire your visions.

The post Animating Clipped Elements In SVG appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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