Clients articles

How To Spark A UX Revolution




 


 

Editor’s Note: Making big changes doesn’t necessarily require big efforts — it’s just a matter of moving in the right direction. We can’t wait for Paul’s new book on User Experience Revolution (free worldwide shipping starting from April 18!), and in this article, Paul shares just some of the little tricks and techniques to bring around a big UX revolution into your company — with a series of small, effective steps.

It feels like everywhere I turn somebody is saying that user experience is the next frontier in business, that we have moved beyond the age of features to creating outstanding experiences.

How To Spark A UX Revolution

But for many of us who work on in-house teams, the reality feels a million miles away from this. Getting management to understand the importance of user experience seems so tough. Even colleagues don’t seem to see the benefit. For those of us in-house, how are we going to get to this golden age of user experience design that people keep promising us?

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World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web (Part 1)




 


 

“There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy,” said Shakespeare’s Hamlet, in the famous scene in which Hamlet teaches Horatio to be a web designer.

World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web (Part 1)

Horatio, as every schoolchild knows, is a designer from Berlin (or sometimes London or Silicon Valley) who has a top-of-the-line MacBook, the latest iPhone and an unlimited data plan over the fastest, most reliable network. But, as Hamlet points out to him, this is not the experience of most of the world’s web visitors.

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Keeping Your Business And Clients Safe With Digital Policies


  

Digital workers, especially web designers and developers, need to recognize that policy influences their products online much as it does offline. Whatever the scale of our enterprise — whether a large corporation, small digital agency, software company or personal venture — we must work within this system of legislated regulations (what we simply call “policies”) in order to maintain our compliance with the law.

Keeping Your Business And Clients Safe With Digital Policies

Our present regulatory environment is a world of rules we must navigate every day at the workplace, especially if we own a business. Why, then, should we expect the digital world in which we build websites and transact business to be any different? It isn’t — in fact, if anything, the regulatory environment on the web has grown more complex and codified in recent years, with new requirements arising quickly for accessibility, cookies, online privacy, the right to be forgotten, the exporting of personal citizenship information, and so on.

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Client Experience Design


  

Let’s be honest: We designers can be difficult to work with. We might come from a controversial company culture, work an unconventional schedule or get impatient whenever our Internet connection is slower than the speed of light. Would you be at ease with a service provider who matches this description?

Client Experience Design

When talking to potential clients, be aware that many will have never solicited a professional design service and likely have little understanding of the design process itself. Keep in mind, too, that some clients have had a poor experience in the past. For many clients, it can be an anxious jump into the deep unknown, a big financial investment steeped in risk.

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Getting Back Into The (Right) Deliverables Business


  

“Get out of the deliverables business” has become quite a mantra in the lean startup and UX movements. There’s much to love in that sentiment — after all, for every wireframe you make, you’re not shipping code to customers.

The first wireframe

But I’m worried that, just like with the concept of a minimum viable product, we’ve taken this sound advice to an extreme that’s actually hurtful to the creation of good products. What follows is an account of my own journey in navigating these stormy design seas together with the community.

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