Content Strategy articles

Getting Practical With Microcopy




 


 

The first question clients and stakeholders seek answers to with any digital product and/or service today — and rightly so — is how to establish an effective user experience. We, as designers, however, know that good design and a good user experience are rarely achieved by fixating on one discipline, but rather by adopting a multidisciplinary approach.

Getting Practical With Microcopy

At best, it’s about finding a balance between UX, UI and interaction design, usability, accessibility, web performance (front end, back end, networking), service design and content strategy (i.e. writing copy).

The post Getting Practical With Microcopy appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

How To Create Content Wireframes For Responsive Design


  

As I was leading my course in responsive web design between 2011 and 2012, I kept stumbling over the process of wireframing. My students tended to focus on the wireframe as being the end game in the planning process. They didn’t understand that responsive design focuses on how users will access the content.

How To Create Content Wireframes For Responsive Design

You can only imagine my relief when I happened to come across a video by Stephen Hay speaking at the Beyond the Desktop conference in 2012. There, in his talk on responsive design, he presented the concept of the content wireframe. This was a huge relief to me. I just knew there was a step before the process got real, but I couldn’t articulate it. In this post, I’ll describe the methods I use to get from content to responsive wireframe — and how you can, too.

The post How To Create Content Wireframes For Responsive Design appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Design Mock-Ups Need Dynamic Content: Tools and Plugins


  

Nothing is perfect on the web. We can’t make sure that our websites always work as intended, but we can try our best to design resilient and flexible websites that aren’t that easy to break — both in terms of interface design and security. Yet neither resilience nor flexibility are usually reflected in our deliverables and mock-ups.

In practice, mock-ups usually represent a perfect experience in a perfect context with perfect data which doesn’t really exist. A good example for it are “optimal” usernames which are perfectly short, fit on a single line on mobile and wrap nicely, or perfect photography that allows for perfectly legible text overlays. It’s not realistic. We need to work with dynamic content in our prototypes, with both average and extremes being represented.

The post Design Mock-Ups Need Dynamic Content: Tools and Plugins appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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