Education articles

Candy Diet

The bestselling novel of 1961 was Allen Drury’s Advise and Consent. Millions of people read this 690-page political novel. In 2016, the big sellers were coloring books. Fifteen years ago, cable channels like TLC (the “L” stood for Learning), Bravo and the History Channel (the “History” stood for History) promised to add texture and information to the blighted TV … Continue reading Candy Diet

Web Development Reading List #183: Comedy In Design, Security Checklist And The Life As Nobody




 


 

When was the last time you took some time to reflect? Constantly surrounded by news and notifications to keep up with and in a rush to get things done more efficiently, it’s important that we take a step back from time to time to reflect our actions and opinions.

Web Development Reading List 183

Reflect if you are working the way you want to work, reflect if you live your life as you want it to be, but also everyday matters. Do you really need that one particular app or service, for example, or could you live without it? Sometimes less is more and efficiency isn’t everything. What counts is how you use your time.

The post Web Development Reading List #183: Comedy In Design, Security Checklist And The Life As Nobody appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Low-Hanging Fruits For Enhancing Mobile UX




 


 

Good UX is what separates successful apps from unsuccessful ones. Customers are won and lost every day because of good or bad user experience design. The most important thing to keep in mind when designing a mobile app is to make sure it is both useful and intuitive.

Low-Hanging Fruits For Enhancing Mobile UX

Obviously, if an app is not useful, it will have no practical value for the user, and no one will have any reason to use it. And even if the app is useful but requires a lot of effort, people won’t bother learning how to use it.

The post Low-Hanging Fruits For Enhancing Mobile UX appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

“Why We Didn’t Use A Framework” (Case Study)




 


 

When we set out to build MeetSpace (a video conferencing app for distributed teams), we had a familiar decision to make: What’s our tech stack going to be? We gathered our requirements, reviewed our team’s skillset and ultimately decided to use vanilla JavaScript and to avoid a front-end framework.

“Why We Didn’t Use A Framework” (A Case Study)

Using this approach, we were able to create an incredibly fast and light web application that is also less work to maintain over time. The average page load on MeetSpace has just 1 uncached request and is 2 KB to download, and the page is ready within 200 milliseconds. Let’s take a look at what went into this decision and how we achieved these results.

The post “Why We Didn’t Use A Framework” (Case Study) appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Top