Interaction Design articles

How To Design Error States For Mobile Apps




 


 

To err is human. Errors occur when people engage with user interfaces. Sometimes, they happen because users make mistakes. Sometimes, they happen because an app fails. Whatever the cause, these errors and how they are handled, have a huge impact on the user experience. Bad error handling paired with useless error messages can fill users with frustration, and can lead to users abandoning your app.

How To Design Error States For Mobile Apps

In this article, we’ll examine how the design of apps can be optimized to prevent user errors and how to create effective error messages in cases when errors occur independently of user input. We’ll also see how well-crafted error handling can turn a moment of failure into a moment of delight.

The post How To Design Error States For Mobile Apps appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Better Interface Design: Logins, Menus, Toggles And Other Fancy Modules


  

CodePen has become the playground for developers. The sandbox where you can build whatever your imagination fancies. Practical things, experimental concepts — it’s a treasure chest, bound to fuel your ideas.

Modal window breaking into parts as soon as a user closed the window.

For this Quick Tip, we have done some digging around and found some interesting UI demos and concepts for you to indulge in and build upon: dialog and modal windows, signup and login screens, navigation and menus, sliders and toggles. Small bits of delight that make the user’s interaction with a website or app more pleasant. Enjoy!

The post Better Interface Design: Logins, Menus, Toggles And Other Fancy Modules appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Getting (Dis)Connected: Shallow Interaction Design For Deeper Human Experiences


  

Our objects are becoming increasingly connected. My watch is connected to my phone, which is connected to the speaker in my living room, which I can also connect (or not) to the speaker in my bedroom. When I go out to dinner with friends, we have to make a concerted effort to keep our handheld and wearable devices silenced or otherwise placed “in the background” of our social experience, so that we can focus on each other.

Getting (Dis)Connected: Shallow Interaction Design For Deeper Human Experiences

As our artifacts and everything around us become more connected, we run the risk as humans of becoming increasingly disconnected from each other — not in a tragic, dystopian kind of way per se, but in a real way that we need to take into consideration when designing for these experiences.

The post Getting (Dis)Connected: Shallow Interaction Design For Deeper Human Experiences appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

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