Web Development Reading List articles

Web Development Reading List #175: GraphQL, IndexedDB2, And An Open Ethical Internet




 


 

With GraphQL, FQL, and IndexedDB2, we have new tools at our fingertips that allow us to build products that are not only more flexible but also faster. With this week’s Web Development Reading List, we’ll dive a bit deeper into these promising technologies and combine this with thoughts about the openness of the internet, ethical choices, and building inclusive products. So without further ado, let’s get started!

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Chrome 57 just hit stable, now the Chrome developer team announced Chrome 58 beta. It includes IndexedDB2.0 support and improvements to iframe navigation. Among the smaller changes are also auto-pause/resume of video on Android when the window is in the background and the fact that HTTPS is now required for the Web Notifications API.

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Web Development Reading List #174: The Bricks We Lay, Remynification, And 0-RTT




 


 

We’re all designers. Whether we do a layout, a product design or write code to design a product technically doesn’t matter here. What does matter though, is that we always take the context of a project into consideration. Because as someone shaping a project so that it is appealing to the clients and works in the best way possible for the target audience, we have a pretty big responsibility.

Web Development Reading List

Imagine architects building a wall out of recycled material that also looks nice — sounds pretty great, right? But seen in the context that this will be a wall that divides people and encourages racism and even more inequality in our society, our first impression of the undertaking suddenly shifts into the opposite direction. We have to make new decisions every time we start a new project, and seeing things in context is crucial to live up to our responsibility — both in our work and our lives.

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Web Development Reading List #173: CSS Grid Support, A Virtual DOM Alternative, And Designing Better Cards




 


 

This week was a big week in terms of web development news. We got much broader support for CSS Grids and Web Assembly, for example, but I also stumbled across some great resources that teach us a lot of valuable things.

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With this Web Development Reading List, we’ll dive deep into security and privacy issues, take a look at a lightweight virtual DOM alternative, and get insights into how we can overcome our biases (or at least how we can better deal with them). So without further ado, let’s dive right in!

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Web Development Reading List #172: On Reporting Bugs, DNS Subdomain Takeovers, And Sustainable UX




 


 

As web developers, we all approach our work very differently. And even when you take a look at yourself, you’ll notice that the way you do your work does vary all the time. I, for example, have not reported a single bug to a browser vendor in the past year, despite having stumbled over a couple. I was just too lazy to write them up, report them, write a test case and care about follow-up comments.

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This week, however, when integrating the Internationalization API for dates and times, I noticed a couple of inconsistencies and specification violations in several browsers, and I reported them. It took me one hour, but now browser vendors can at least fix these bugs. Today, I filed two new issues, because I’ve become more aware again of things that work in one browser but not in others. I think it’s important to change the way we work from time to time. It’s as easy as caring more about the issues we face and reporting them back.

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Web Development Reading List #171: Leaks, SHA-1 Collision, And Brotli




 


 

Phew, what a week! Due to an HTML-parsing bug, Cloudflare experienced a major data leak, and the first practical collision for SHA-1 was revealed as well.

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We should take these events as an occasion to reconsider if a centralized front-end load balancer that modifies your traffic is a good idea after all. And it’s definitely time to upgrade your TLS-certificate if you still serve SHA-1, too. Here’s what else happened this week.

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Web Development Reading List #170: Hamburger Alternatives, Libsodium In PHP And Choosing Profit




 


 

As web developers, we need to rely on our knowledge, and choosing solutions we’re already familiar with is often the most convenient approach to solving a problem. However, not only technology is evolving but also our knowledge of how to use it.

For a while, we thought it’s best to use base64 encoding for inlining assets into CSS files, for example, and that loading JavaScript asynchronously will make websites faster. With more evidence and research, however, we came to realize that we were wrong. We should take this as an occasion to remind ourselves to question our habits and from now on ask ourselves if the solution we have in mind for a given problem really is still the best one we could choose.

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Web Development Reading List #169: TLS At Scale, Brotli Benefits, And Easy Onion Deployments




 


 

Everyone here can have a big impact on a project, on someone else. I get very excited about this when I read stories like the one about an intern at Google who did an experiment that saves tons of traffic, or when I get an email from one of my readers who now published an awesome complete beginner’s guide to front-end development.

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We need to recognize that our industry depends on people who share their open-source code and we should support them and their projects that we heavily rely on. Finally, we also need to understand that these people perhaps don’t want a job as an employee at some big company but remain independent instead. So if you make money with a project that uses open-source libraries or other resources, maybe Valentine’s Day might be an occasion to show your appreciation and make the author a nice present.

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Web Development Reading List #168: Preload With Webpack, A Guide To Security Headers, And Service Worker Fallacies




 


 

With great power comes great responsibility. This week I found some resources that got me thinking: Service Workers that download 16MB of data on the user’s first visit? A Bluetooth API in the browser? Private browser windows that aren’t so private at all?

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We have a lot of methods and strategies to fix these kinds of things. We can give the browser smarter hints, put security headers and HTTPS in place, serve web fonts locally, and build safer network protocols. The responsibility is in our hands.

The post Web Development Reading List #168: Preload With Webpack, A Guide To Security Headers, And Service Worker Fallacies appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Web Development Reading List #167: On Team Retreats, Immutable Cache, And Eliminating Clearfix Hacks




 


 

When working in a team, we focus so much on the work, that we often forget that we all have something in common. Something that is so obvious that we underestimate it: we all are human beings. And well, if we want to grow as a team and get better at what we do, we should embrace this fact more. In fact, I just came back from a week-long team retreat where we had team activities, team games, and sessions and discussions about how we can achieve just that.

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We figured out how much we value diversity, we realized how different the English language and its words are perceived by people from different countries, and we’ve seen short talks on various topics like work-life-balance but also on technical stuff like Docker or intercepting any computer’s traffic with a Raspberry Zero. So if you have the chance to work in a team, use the opportunity and exchange views and share information with your co-workers. Work is part of your life, so why not make it a lovely part?

The post Web Development Reading List #167: On Team Retreats, Immutable Cache, And Eliminating Clearfix Hacks appeared first on Smashing Magazine.

Web Development Reading List #166: Efficient Docker, CSP Learnings, And JavaScript’s Global Object




 


 

What fuels your work? What fuels your mind? What do you do on a non-productive day or when you’re sad? Nowadays, I try to embrace these times. I try to relax and not be angry at myself for not being productive.

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And the fun fact about it? Well, most of the times when I could convince my mind that not being productive is nothing to feel bad about, things take a sudden turn: I get my ideas back, my productivity rises and, in effect, I even achieve more work than on an average day. It’s important to try to be human.

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